5:55 Kempton Racing Tips (11th October)

The Winners Enclosure
An EBF Novice Stakes (Class 5) (2yo). 

Twelve two-year-olds take part: Nine with race experience and three debutantes.

A number of leading trainers. Let's take a look at the major protagonists. 

For a tip why not check out The Winners Enclosure? Home of UK Horse Racing tips and previews.

 Richard Hughes hasn't achieved the dizzy heights of some rookie trainers but a capable handler. It's interesting to see Jamie Spencer takes the ride on Glendevon. This chestnut son of Scat Daddy could have been an expensive foal when not sold for $220,000. This fact was compounded when he wasn't sold at the yearling sales for just $80,000. Whatever the cost, this horse was relatively fancied on debut in the hands of Spencer priced 10/1. He had no chance of beating the odds-on favourite but it was a great first effort. I wouldn't be in any rush to bet at short odds as this could be a stiff task with a few dark horses.

Keith Dalgleish has been waiting a long time for Cheeseandpickle to make her second start after a stylish win back in April. This daughter of Helmet must have suffered an injury to be off course for over 180 days. She has to shoulder a winner's penalty which makes life difficult. She will need to be primed to win today but deserves respect. 

A class trainer, Sir Michael Stoute. Moqarrar races in the second colours of owner Hamdan Al Maktoum. It never pays to be too dogmatic about which is better. In fact, I think the second string is often better. This son of Exchange Rate cost 120,000G at the yearling sales. To be fair, he ran an encouraging debut at Newmarket when third behind the talented Betty F. I would keep note of the betting here. If starting 13/2 & less SP it would bring more confidence.

Exprompt has raced three times and gradually getting his act together. Probably needs to do a little more and a wide draw isn't good news on this turning course. Not without hope.

Dagain made his debut at Newmarket when starting 50/1. This Irish-bred son of Dawn Approach finished seventh. Connections, John Connolly & Odile Griffith, have owned a number of decent horses in their time and this gelding cost 200,000G at the yearling sales, which speaks well. Would make more interest if backed. 

A couple of fancied debutantes worthy of respect. 

Saeed bin Suroor has had a forgettable reason which has basically arisen to a lack of juveniles compared with Charlie Appleby. I think this matter will be resolved next season. This lack of numbers has impacted on the general level within the two-year-old ranks. Laieth has been noted as a juvenile of interest. This son of Dubawi cost 550,000G at the yearling sales. Suroor has a good strike rate at this course. If strong in the betting it would give greater hope. If very weak, I would be more prudent with your bets. 

Roger Varian fields Kawasir who adorns the first colours for Hamdan Al Maktoum. A $400,000 foal. This chestnut colt is a son of Speightstown. One to note if strongly fancied in the betting.

Conclusion: A tricky race. Glendevon is a short price. I wouldn't knock the horse's chance but Hughes doesn't seem to have much luck at winning and even money seems rather short for my liking. Moqarrar has a wide draw but experience. The betting is key. If priced 13/2 & less SP it would bring more confidence. Cheeseandpickle needs to beat a few fair opponents and shoulder a winning penalty, absence and being a filly it would be a very smart return. Laieth and Kawasire are worthy of respect but need to be fit and primed. Turning courses are not the best starting place for debutantes but still could go well. Dagain wasn't beaten a million miles on debut and costly purchase.  He is likely to show much more today. I would let the betting settle before jumping in with both feet if you fancy a bet. On balance, a watching brief.    

Visit Roger Varian's Website At HTD

Roger Varian, Horse Racing, Horse Trainer.
Welcome To Horse Trainer Directory


Roger Varian took over the reins at Kremlin House Stables in February 2011 on the retirement of his mentor and boss of 10 years, Michael Jarvis.

His record in subsequent seasons makes for impressive reading with over 50 Stakes winners already on the board, including eleven at Group 1 level.

From a betting perspective, Varian has a very similar approach to training horses as his mentor Micahel Jarivs. He can win with debutantes and especially well versed in placing horses well on their second start at two. Definitely a trainer worth of a bet. Take a look at NetBet for the betting prices on horse racing and all sporting markets.     

His career highlight to date was undoubtedly Kingston Hill’s St Leger triumph in 2014, a first Classic victory for Roger and for jockey Andrea Atzeni. Kingston Hill also finished second in the Derby and fourth in the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe from the widest of draws.

That same year, Roger was also responsible for sending out three two-year-old Group 1 winners in Cursory Glance (Moyglare Stud Stakes), Belardo (Dewhurst Stakes) and Vert De Grece (Criterium International). Belardo went on to secure top juvenile honours in the European Free Handicap.

Cursory Glance was also victorious in the Albany Stakes at Royal Ascot whilst talented mare Ambivalent struck in the Group 2 Middleton Stakes at York in addition to finishing third in the Dubai Sheema Classic at Meydan on Dubai World Cup night.

2015 saw the Varian Stable team send out over 100 winners for the first time in a calendar year with quality again to the fore thanks to pattern race successes by Intilaaq, Steps and Realtra.

Looking back, the signs were always good when Roger’s very first runner, Laaheb, finished fourth in the Group 1 Sheema Classic on World Cup night in Dubai while his first representative on home soil, Eton Forever, stormed to victory in the Spring Mile at Doncaster.

In September 2011, Roger joined the select group of trainer’s to saddle a Group 1 winner in their first season when Nahrain won the Prix de l’Opera at Longchamp on Arc day.
Group 1 success has been achieved with regularity since – with Nahrain landing the Flower Bowl at Belmont in 2012, Ambivalent the Irish Pretty Polly in 2013followed by Kingston Hill’s Racing Post Trophy win in October of the same year.

Roger enjoyed watching racing as a child and when he was 13 he began riding out point-to-pointers for Alan and Lawney Hill, who lived locally. During this time Roger got the racing ‘bug’ and set his heart on becoming a National Hunt jockey.

He worked for Ian and Tockie McKie before moving to the legendary Josh Gifford’s stable where he rode seven winners as a conditional.

Prior to his stint at Gifford’s, Roger spent 10 weeks during the summer working for Michael at Kremlin House and, little did he know at the time that this would be one of the most significant things he would ever do.

He then went to America to take up the offer of a three-month placement with Maryland-based jumps trainer Jack Fisher.

Six weeks into his stay Roger had a bad fall and smashed his wrist, putting an end to his riding dreams. On hearing about the accident, Michael asked him to become his assistant, and the rest is history.

During his 10 years with Michael, Roger helped oversee the careers of Oaks winner Eswarah, five-time Group 1 scorer Rakti, top sprinter Iffraaj and the globe-trotting Pressing among others.

Source: Roger Varian Website

Visit Roger Varian's Website here.

Contact details: Kremlin House Stables, Fordham Road, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 7AQ

Tel: 01638 661702

Email: office@varianstable.com 

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''Why listen to whispers when this comes straight from the horse's mouth?''


Welcome to the one-stop shop where everything gallops. This resource details a comprehensive list of Horse Trainer Websites, Blogs & Twitter links for National Hunt & Flat racing. Take advantage of this primary source of data by clicking our ‘Quick Buttons’ to detail all the latest news. Why listen to the whispers when this comes straight from the horse’s mouth?

With our website going ‘live’ we've been amazed by the response with testimonials/feedback from horse trainers, journalists, racing fans & welfare groups amongst those who have a love of everything equine.

What makes our website so impressive is the ease you can navigate 100s of resources with our user-friendly features. Three simple ‘Quick button’ allow access to trainers of both codes, including our latest development the ‘Track’ facility which highlights every racecourse website & twitter link so you need never miss a day’s racing, promotions or news.

Come join the community spirit by exchanging links to your equine-related websites for free. Help support your favourite charities by telling us about their work, appeals & successes promoting racing welfare.  In addition, we have some wonderful deals for advertisers from a cool full page to a tiny chilled-out text link. Be spontaneous, imaginative with our brilliant new concept the Pop-Up Website for cutting-edge promotion.               

Don’t waste time searching the Internet high & low when the Horse Trainer Directory is the easiest way to keep you in the know. With regular updates you won’t miss a stride because we’ve gone the extra furlong. 



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Horse Racing Bets

Horse racing is an age sport within the betting niche. For those who know the intricacies of the game, the possibilities are endless when raking in rewards by playing online. In the case of millennials, betting on horse racing can be tricky, however given the information floating on the net, many horse racing betting sites endeavour to offer great insights into how you can better your odds, which bet types to work with, how to place your bets and what you need to know if you are to profit from horse racing.

Let's have a look at a few key elements below.

Placing your wager

Betting on horses is no rocket science, although it does require some due diligence. The most important tools you will need for placing wagers are daily racing forms, handicapping tip sheets, and racetrack programs. These will guide you when deciding which horses to bet on depending on the form and previous race performance. With these, you will also have access to other information like jockeys, trainers, racetracks and horse numbers. Before placing your wager, you can calculate the actual payout as well which is something unheard of in previous years.

Horse racing betting markets

There is a wide array of betting options in horse racing. Just like in any other sports market, horse racing offers different odds of winning, which either fall into the categories of high, average or low odds of winning. Markets that offer a high chance of winning are often associated with lower payouts while those markets that offer a low chance of winning have larger payout potential.

Let's take a look at some of the most common horse racing betting markets and how they pay.

Higher odds of winning

Show- there is a very good chance of winning when choosing this market. The ‘show’ market means that you select a horse that finishes among the top 3.
Place- the ‘place’ market just like the ‘show’ market has modest payouts. When opting for this market, the horse you select has to finish either in 1st position or 2nd position.

Average chances of winning

Win- the horse you select has to finish in 1st position in the ‘win’ market.
Quinella- in the ‘quinella’ market, you have to select 2 horses that will finish in the 1st and 2nd position. They don’t necessarily have to finish in the order you selected but as long as they both finish in the first two positions, you are a winner.

Low chances of winning

Exacta- the ‘exacta’ market is a riskier bet as you have to choose 2 horses that will finish the race in the 1st and 2nd position according to your order. It is much more difficult to win in this market but if you do, the payouts are quite lucrative.
Trifecta- the ‘trifecta’ market is as hard as it gets in horse racing betting. You have to select the 3 horses that will finish the race in the same order as you choose i.e. 1st, 2nd and 3rd.

Other horse racing markets include theSuperfacta (pick 4 winning horses in the exact order), Pick 3 (your horse has to win 3 consecutive races), Pick 4 (horse has to win 4 consecutive races) and Pick 6 (horse has to win 6 consecutive races).
Top tips

When it comes to horse racing bets, it is important to keep the following in mind;
  1. Listen carefully to the television simulcast commentator
  2. Choose your bet from the top ten winning jockeys (9/10 times these are the horses that win)
  3. 1 in every 3 favourite horses wins, however, at low payouts


Evolution of Horse Racing

The equestrian sport of horse racing was born from unplanned competitions many centuries ago and by 4500 BC, the sport was highly popular among Aristocrats, wealthy Asians and parts of Europe that it became known as the ‘Sport of Kings’.
The first notable recognition of horse racing as a competitive sport was in 648 BC during the annual Greek Olympics. It proved to be a highly entertaining sport and its popularity soon spread to other empires and states including that of the Romans. A few years after horse racing made its debut at the Greek Olympics, the sport was formatted into forming different types including mounted racing and chariot racing.
Modern horse racing as we know it today emerged during the reign of Queen Anne in England between 1702 and 1714. It is during this period that the sport became ‘professional’ as a team sport with a clear differentiation of roles between the jockey and the trainer. It is also during this time that the first horse racing wagers were placed by ‘male’ aristocrats only.
In 1750, the Jockey Club was established. Its 3 core primary duties were to formulate the guiding rules and regulations, regulate horserace breeding and sanction racecourses. The Jockey Club is still present today and it is still guided by its founding principles.
Different Forms of Horse Racing
Ever since the first recorded races, horse racing continued to evolve. The following are the major changes in the forms of horse racing.
Flat racing - this is the classic form of horse racing, run on a level racecourse. Flat racing covers both short races commonly known as ‘sprints’ and long races commonly referred to as ‘staying races or routes’. Short distances in flat racing on average are 402m or 2 furlongs, while the long distances on average measure 4,828m or 24 furlongs.
Steeplechase - this form of horse racing was developed soon after flat racing. In order to finish, the racehorses have to jump over certain obstacles in front of them. The obstacles in a steeplechase vary according to the region, such as in Ireland for instance. Here they prefer smaller hurdles mostly made of temporarily erected heights while in other regions like in England, Australia and most parts of the US, the obstacles are generally permanently fixed fences and ditches. Steeplechase races, on average, have a distance of 1600m and is considered the most lucrative horse race, which is easily shown by the value of the Grand National Run in England with prize money of £1,000,000 to date.
Harness - this type of horse racing adopted its style from the traditional chariot racing and involves a horse pulling a wheeled cart, which is commonly referred to as a sulky. Harness racing can be conducted in 2 different gaits i.e. pacing and trotting. Pacing is when the sulky moves its legs laterally. Pacing is mostly used in the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. Trotting, on the other hand, is when the sulky moves diagonally and is most common in continental Europe. Unlike in other forms of race horsing, there is no jockey in Harness racing, but rather a driver.
Endurance - this is the most recent form of horse racing. It originated during the First World War and the aim is to test the endurance of the horse. This race covers a large distance and often it is run in extreme conditions. The average distance run in an endurance race is 160km. Endurance racing is divided into different sections (loops/phases/legs) and after each section, the horses pass through a veterinary check to assess if it’s still fit to continue racing.
Gambling in horse racing in modern-day land-based establishments started in 1961. Gambling mogul George Alfred James established the first land-based establishment allowing horse racing betting in Wales which was named the Port Talbot Casino Club. From that time, betting on horse racing gradually began to gather momentum and it soon became the most popular type of sports betting on a global scale by the start of the 1980s.
Betting on horse racing, however, took a sharp turn for the better after the emergence of mobile technology in particular around 2006. As mobile technology infiltrated to all the corners of the world, so too did new online bookies. Online sportsbooks such as Betway, facilitated by easy-to-use mobile operating systems such as Android made it easier for punters to bet on the move. This revolution on mobile betting soon dominated the gambling circles led the gambling industry to increase its revenue figures exponentially. As early as 2008, after the emergence of mobile technology, global revenue generated from betting on horse racing was a staggering US$115 billion.
How to bet on horse racing
There are generally two forms which guide betting on horse racing, one is popular in the US and the other in all other continents.
The Pari-mutuel is a form of horse racing bets used in the US, whereby all bets of a particular type are pooled together and the payout odds are calculated proportionally, sharing the pool among all the winning bets. Pari-mutuel is also known as mutual betting or tote betting in other parts of the world.
In Europe and most other continents, betting in horse racing is mostly done under betting markets. The odds are all pre-calculated by bookmakers and all punters have to do is choose their market of choice and place their bets. There is a variety of horse racing betting markets terms used online and at land-based establishments. The 3 common types are the ‘Win or Straight’, ‘Place’ and ‘Show’ markets. Under the ‘Win’ market, punters have to predict the horse that will finish in the first position. In the ‘Place’ market, punters have to select a horse that will finish either in the 1st or 2nd position, while the ‘Show’ market, punters have to select the horse that will finish in position 1, 2 or 3.

Roger Charlton's Website At HTD

Welcome To Horse Trainer Directory

Roger took over at Jeremy Tree's Beckhampton House Stables in 1990 and never looked back. Group winner after group winner followed including the English Derby with "Quest for Fame" and the French Derby with "Sanglamore" and he is now one of the country's top trainers. 

Roger went to Beckhampton to work as Assistant Trainer to Jeremy Tree in 1978 and after 13 years he took over the Trainers License in 1990. Since the 1820's Beckhampton has been the home to 6 previous Trainers and over 30 Classic winners have been trained on the famous gallops. Trainers have included; Sam Darling and his son Fred, Sir Noel Murless and Sir Gordon Richards. 

During his time with Jeremy Tree the stable stars included; "Rainbow Quest","Scintillate", "Sharpo", "Known Fact", and "Danehill" who is arguably one of the most influential Stallions in the last 15 years. In addition to "Sanglamore" and "Quest For Fame", Roger has trained the Group 1 winners; "Tamarisk", "Patavellian", "Tante Rose", "Avonbridge", Cityscape and more recently Al Kazeem. 

The major Handicap successes have included; The Old Newton Cup, The Zetland Gold Cup, The Magnet Cup, The Britannia, The George V Handicap, The Duke of Edinburgh, 2 Cambridgeshires, 2 Bunbury Cups, 3 Totesport Miles, and 3 Stewards Cups.

Contact details:

Beckhampton House
Beckhampton
Marlborough
SN8 1QR
Wiltshire

Email: Office@BeckhamptonStables.com 
Tel: +44 (0) 1672 539 533
Mobile: +44 (0) 7710 784511



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HORSE TRAINER DIRECTORY





''Why listen to whispers when this comes straight from the horse's mouth?''


Welcome to the one-stop shop where everything gallops. This resource details a comprehensive list of Horse Trainer Websites, Blogs & Twitter links for National Hunt & Flat racing. Take advantage of this primary source of data by clicking our ‘Quick Buttons’ to detail all the latest news. Why listen to the whispers when this comes straight from the horse’s mouth?


With our website going ‘live’ we've been amazed by the response with testimonials/feedback from horse trainers, journalists, racing fans & welfare groups amongst those who have a love of everything equine.

What makes our website so impressive is the ease you can navigate 100s of resources with our user-friendly features. Three simple ‘Quick button’ allow access to trainers of both codes, including our latest development the ‘Track’ facility which highlights every racecourse website & twitter link so you need never miss a day’s racing, promotions or news.

Come join the community spirit by exchanging links to your equine-related websites for free. Help support your favourite charities by telling us about their work, appeals & successes promoting racing welfare.  In addition, we have some wonderful deals for advertisers from a cool full page to a tiny chilled-out text link. Be spontaneous, imaginative with our brilliant new concept the Pop-Up Website for cutting-edge promotion.               

Don’t waste time searching the Internet high & low when the Horse Trainer Directory is the easiest way to keep you in the know. With regular updates you won’t miss a stride because we’ve gone the extra furlong. 


Supporting British Racing




      ''NEED TO FIND A TRAINER ON YOUR DOORSTEP?''





Want to bet on horses? Keep these things in mind before you place your first bet

Want to bet on horses? Keep these things in mind before you place your first bet
Want to bet on horses? Keep these things in mind before you place your first bet
If you have finally found the intriguing world of horse race betting, you are probably eager to start making your wildest predictions in the hopes of earning big. However, there are some basics that we need to go over if you are to succeed in horse race betting. So if you’re ready to start understanding how this whole thing works, keep reading. Just like you would go to http://pokeracepro.com/ for your daily dose of poker, you’ve come to the right place for betting tips. Here are the most important things to consider before betting:

It’s not a science

You can research a lot of stuff, and you can make your predictions based on a lot of things that add up and make sense. However, you still need a lot of luck to be triumphant. Winning has nothing to do with beginner’s luck and losing has nothing to do with not having it. It’s just a matter of odds, and as you might be aware, odds can mess up your plans. Be ready to face what sometimes might even seem like injustice as the horse you bet on has the worst race of their career and ruins your ticket, or how the sloppiest horse in the race manages to pull a miracle.

You don’t have to pick a straight winner, but you don’t have to stop there either
When you bet on horses, you have the option of betting on other things and not just on straight up victories. As you would imagine, betting on which horse wins can be quite difficult, and sometimes the rewards aren’t worth the stress. You can bet on whether or not one or multiple horses place in the top three, for example. You can also go the extra mile if you’re feeling lucky and bet on the exact outcome of the race, down to which horses get the second and third places.

You need the real-life experience


No matter how authentic or enticing an online race betting experience will be, it will never be able to beat the feeling you get when you go watch a horse race live. Even if you stick to online betting, it’s a good idea to go check out at least a run and get a feel for how things go in this kind of environment. Standing there, on the edge of your seat, ticket in hand, not knowing whether you’ll end up taking it to the window to cash out or just ripping it like everyone else around you, that’s the kind of excitement that will get you going in horse race betting.